One of the most common sticking points for electricity customers is what, exactly, the difference is between an electricity provider (also called REP, CRES, or electric supplier) and an electric utility (also called a TDSP, TDU, or EDU). They’re both vital to the success of electricity deregulation, but they play very different roles. Understanding how they fit together can make a big difference in your overall confidence as an electricity customer trying to shop for the best electricity plan.
Still, we like that if you choose to re-up with FirstEnergy again at the end of your initial term, you won’t have to worry whether you’re enrolling at an expensive time of year. First, since it offers just two options, constant for years, its prices are set with the long haul in mind. Second, since the electricity grid in Pennsylvania is more taxed during winter than any other season (space heating accounts for 50 percent of household electricity consumption in PA; air conditioning just three percent), signing up in summer means prices won’t be temporarily inflated.

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Given the wide selection of electricity plans available, how do renters choose the best electricity plan? The key to finding the best plan is to have an idea about how much electricity you use and select the contract length that is close to your rental contract term. Typical apartment electricity plans are best for 500 – 1000 kWh usage per month and 1 – 12 month contract term lengths. Enter your zip code above to search and compare apartment electricity plans with this criteria.
We’ve done some of the work for you. We homed in on five of the biggest electric companies in Pennsylvania: Constellation Energy, Direct Energy, FirstEnergy Solutions, Green Mountain Energy, and Just Energy. We compared their plans, rates, special offers, and philanthropies, then dug into the contract fine print to uncover sneaky fees and the truth about discounts. Because most providers offer a range of options, we also looked at the companies behind the plans — paying attention to their corporate impact, customer service reputation, and customer resources in particular.
FirstEnergy’s online shopping experience is woefully outdated, which makes it harder than usual to get to the fine print. You’ll need to take the first step of signing up — follow the Enroll Now! Link — to get “Terms and Conditions” to appear. The website also pays the typical lip service to the green movement, but FirstEnergy plants generate over 95 percent of the company’s total electricity from conventional fuels.
TDSPs or EDUs are the companies and people who own and maintain utility poles and power lines. They are the ones that you call when your power goes out. These utility companies are responsible for the physical delivery of electricity to your home or business. Before deregulation, everyone was required to buy their electricity from their local utility company.  With deregulation, the supply of electricity was opened to competition while the delivery of electricity continues to be regulated by the state’s public utility commission.
CenterPoint Intelligent Energy Solutions LLC, IES, which manages TrueCost, is not the same legal entity as CenterPoint Energy Resources Corp. (CERC) or CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, LLC (CEHE), nor is IES regulated by the Railroad Commission of Texas or the Public Utility Commission of Texas. You do not have to buy products or services from IES in order to continue to receive quality regulated services from CERC or CEHE.
Champaign City ordinance requires every household to sign up for weekly solid waste pick-up. All solid waste (trash, recyclables, etc.) collection in the City of Champaign is handled by private solid waste haulers who are licensed.  Licenses are issued by the City Clerk.  The haulers listed below can be found in the yellow pages and are currently licensed to haul in Champaign:
CenterPoint Intelligent Energy Solutions LLC, IES, which manages TrueCost, is not the same legal entity as CenterPoint Energy Resources Corp. (CERC) or CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, LLC (CEHE), nor is IES regulated by the Railroad Commission of Texas or the Public Utility Commission of Texas. You do not have to buy products or services from IES in order to continue to receive quality regulated services from CERC or CEHE.
Electricity is deregulated in two Canadian provinces: Ontario and Alberta. Both markets showed price spikes in the first year of dereguation, but then settled down into a volatile but reasonably stable environment. Alberta's market is dominated by fossil fuel generation and as such reacts more closely to the price of natural gas. Ontario's generation mix is about 50% nuclear.[1]
The Texas Senate Bill 7, passed in 2002, gave 5.6 million Texans the power to choose a retail electric provider (REP) to supply electricity to their home or business. This bill facilitated a competitive energy marketplace that 85 percent of Texans can capitalize on today. Energy choice is available to residents in Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth as well as other cities in Texas.
More than two dozen electric cooperatives provide power to rural customers and residents of many South Dakota towns. Each customer is a member and owner of the co-op. The business of the co-op is directed by its general manager and governed by a board of directors, elected by its membership. Three power cooperatives – Basin, East River and Rushmore – are generation and transmission cooperatives. These organizations provide electricity to their member co-ops that, in turn, deliver the power to their customers.

Since 1996, when the energy market was opened up to competition, UK consumers have been able to switch energy suppliers to find a cheaper gas and electricity deal. Previously, Ofgem did set a maximum price for energy; but now Ofgem only regulates the market as a whole — that means creating a regulating schemes to support vulnerable households and more.
Knowing your estimated monthly kWh usage and the contract length needed will help you narrow down your apartment electricity plan options. Use ElectricityPlans.com Texas apartment electricity plan finder to select the best electricity plan to fit your specific needs. Find the best deal on apartment electricity in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth, Killeen, Corpus Christi, Round Rock, and many more cities across Texas.
The main difference between a provider and TDSP is that a TDSP is in charge of delivering electricity supply to a consumer's home or business. Contact your local TDSP for emergency situations such as hazardous electrical wires, storm alerts and power outages. Also, AEP offers McAllen residents and business owners with storm safety tips and service request information. Contact the TDSP at 1-877-373-4858 for electrical safety issues and 1-866-223-8508 for outage emergencies.
A CLEC is a local exchange carrier providing local telephone service in competition with the incumbent local exchange carrier (ILEC). Midcontinent Communications is an example of a CLEC serving South Dakota customers. See a complete list of CLEC companies (124 KB). Some companies, such as Qwest, Midstate Communications and Knology, can be both a CLEC and an ILEC (see above) in different service areas.
The more cool air you lose, the harder your air conditioning unit works and the higher your electricity bill will be. Install blinds, hang curtains or get storm windows made to keep cool air from seeping out. Even mesh screens, on the outside of your home, will help deflect solar radiation. You might even consider replacing old windows that leak cold air and let in heat.
Texas currently produces and consumes more electricity than any other state in the country. This energy consumption is due to its size, but the ample land makes it a major producer of wind power – a renewable, or green, energy source. The environmentally friendly energy created by wind power is available to many Texas residents to supply the electricity in their home or business.
As of April 2014, 16 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have deregulated electricity markets. Along with aforementioned Maryland and Texas, electricity deregulation is current in Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. Seven additional U.S. states began the process of electricity deregulation but have suspended efforts: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Virginia, and Wyoming.[5]
In Texas, if you’re renting an apartment, townhouse, or small home, you need affordable electricity that fits your lifestyle, budget, and lease term. That’s why it’s smart to shop for an electricity plan designed especially with renters in mind. Apartment electricity plans have better prices at lower electricity usage levels and shorter available contract lengths so that you can stay flexible and stay in budget.
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